About Us

Summer Boulder Tree CareHi! I am Dave Walker a third-generation Coloradan. I grew up in Englewood, Colorado and was introduced to the Colorado outdoors at an early age. I began fishing with my father before I can remember, and at the age of eight, my brother introduced me to mountaineering. I developed a passion for the natural world that continues to this day.

I began working as an arborist in 1986 in Rhinebeck, New York, and although I loved the work, I really didn’t care for New York. So, I moved back to Colorado to attend graduate school in geology. I earned my M.S. in geochemistry from CU in 1992, and worked for several years as an environmental consultant for a company in Boulder, but was always dreaming of going back to the best job I ever had – tree climbing.

Arborists have a very dangerous job, and there are lots of safer professions that pay much better – environmental consulting is one. But, trees are my passion, and after a while, you have to follow your heart. So, I opened Walker Tree Care, LLC in 2002, and never looked back.

Shortly after opening this business, I became a Certified Arborist by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) , and have continued to build my credentials in the tree industry. I am now a Qualified Supervisor with a license to apply pesticides to ornamental plants issued by the Colorado Department of Agriculture, and I am an ISA Qualified Tree Risk Assessor.

A few years ago, my old environmental company called me up because they had an interesting project in the Amazon Rain Forest of Ecuador. They had a contract to install canopy bridges across roadways and oil pipelines in the oil fields there so that monkeys and other animals could migrate normally despite the changes to their environment. They needed an environmental scientist that could climb trees, and I was the first person they thought of. Naturally, I jumped at the opportunity, and made six trips over 3 years.

The first two trips were to install 11 bridges, and several motion-sensing cameras on the bridges. The remaining trips were to change batteries and memory cards in the cameras.

We didn’t see any animals on the bridges for about 2 years, but in the last six months of the project we collected over 1000 pictures of monkeys on the bridges. Walsh Ecuador and Petroamazonas (the Ecuadorian oil company we were working for) were given an award by the Energy Institute of London for innovations in the energy industry for this project.